Judge Jeanine: Where did our respect for the military go?

This country no longer respects the people who give us the right to enjoy the freedoms we enjoy

Quote of the Day 10/21/14

“At all times sincere friends of freedom have been rare, and its triumphs have been due to minorities…” — Lord Acton [John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton] (1834-1902)

An American Decline that Must Be Reversed By Alan Caruba

The tendency of pundits is to address the decline in American culture and traditional moral values. The concerns addressed include the rather sudden, but widespread embrace of same-sex marriages or calls for the legalization of marijuana so anyone can get high without the fear of arrest.

You can probably name a few things you consider evidence of decline, but there is one you are not likely to notice much. It’s the nation’s infrastructure of highways, airports, waterways and ports. It’s only dramatic declines such as the decay of Detroit, once one of the nation’s most dynamic cities that get attention because it is so blatant. We judge the backwardness of third world nations by their bad roads and lack of infrastructure to support their economies.

We don’t, however, think of the U.S. as a nation in decline, but we are.

A September study released by the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) revealed that overall spending on public infrastructure fell 10.5% between 2003 and 2012. As reported by The Wall Street Journal, “Spending on highways and streets by federal, state and local governments, dropped a higher 19% during that same period, according to the study.”

NAM president, Jay Timmons, said, “The United States is stuck in a decade-long decline (in infrastructure spending) that will eventually harm job creation, future productivity and our ability to compete head-to-head with companies all over the globe.” When a manufacturer cannot transport their product in a timely fashion, it puts them at a disadvantage. Multiply that by the nation’s many manufacturers and you have a very big problem for lack of adequate highways, roads, and bridges

The great power of America’s infrastructure was supported by the maintenance it requires. The 2013 study was commissioned by the Building America’s Future Educational Fund and NAM to survey manufacturers. It found that they “overwhelmingly viewed America’s infrastructure as old, inefficient, and badly in need of modernization.”

Findings included 70% who believed that U.S. infrastructure is in fair or poor shape and needs a great deal or quite a lot of improvement. The same percentage believe that road are getting worse and 65% did not believe that infrastructure, especially in their region, is positioned to respond to the competitive demands of a growing economy over the next 10-15 years.

This may not seem very exciting compared to news of combat in the Middle East or the threat of Ebola, but consider that, in early October, the Financial Times reported that “China has surpassed the US in terms of GDP based on purchasing power parity (PPP), becoming the largest in the world by this measure, International Monetary Fund estimates show. In 2014 China reached $17.6 trillion or 16.48 percent of the world’s purchasing-power-adjusted GDP, while the US made slightly less, 16.28 percent or $17.4 trillion, according to IMF data.“

We are now number two in the global economy.

The NAM study’s research, said University of Maryland Professor Jeffrey Werling, “helps confirm what engineers and executives both know, The quality and quantity of current U.S. infrastructure is deficient, and these deficiencies are already hampering economic growth.”

For years, a federal fuel tax has helped underwrite needed highway construction, but it hasn’t been increased since 1993 and annual collections have been declining due to fuel-efficient vehicles and motorists who have been driving less than in the past. The Wall Street Journal reported that “Congress has shown little interest in raising the 18.2 cent-a-gallon tax” and has relied on stop-gap funding.

There was a time when a politician would jump at the chance to have a bridge or a strip of highway named after him. Those days are over. We have a Congress that can barely agree on anything, let alone something as undramatic as funding infrastructure projects. The States and local communities are squeezed for their own funds, burdened with pensions and other costs.

None of this bodes well, but at least we can say we’ve been warned, eh?

© Alan Caruba, 2014

ObamaCare Bronze Plan Premiums To Jump 14% In 2015 By JED GRAHAM

ObamaCare shoppers in search of the lowest-cost plan may come down with a mild case of rate shock when 2015 exchange enrollment begins next month.

An examination of next year’s rates in the biggest city in 15 states and Washington, D.C., reveals that the cost of the cheapest bronze plan will jump an average of 13.9% for 40-year-old non-smokers earning 225% of the poverty level ($26,260).

In Seattle, the cost of the cheapest bronze plan, after subsidies, will soar 64%, from $60 to $98 per month, for individuals at this income level. Some other cities seeing notable gains include Providence (up 38%, from $72 to $99 per month); Los Angeles (up 27%, from $88 to $111); Las Vegas (up 22%, from $100 to $122); and New York (up 18%, from $97 to $114).

The surge in the cost of the cheapest subsidized bronze policy could negatively impact enrollment in 2015. This year, 39% of bronze plan choosers picked the lowest-price option. One might expect that share to rise in 2015, when millions of people who passed on ObamaCare exchanges this year are expected to enroll.

Read More At Investor’s Business Daily:

Is Everything Political in the Obama Administration? by Bernie Goldberg

With the ISIS military advancing on Baghdad, the Pentagon has issued a report outlining what Secretary of State John Kerry has called “the biggest challenge of all that we face right now.” Worldwide terrorism? No, silly. But if you said global warming, give yourself a green star.

As an editorial in the Wall Street Journal puts it: “The Pentagon Goes to Climate War.” And the subhead: “Hagel wants to retool the military to stop glaciers from melting.” Ouch!

No one is saying that the United States military can’t walk and chew gum at the same time, that it can’t be worried about both Islamic terrorists and melting glaciers. But why is climate change a concern of our armed forces at all? Why is global warming a national security matter requiring a military solution? You should know these things but since you obviously don’t, I’ll tell you – or more accurately, the just-released Pentagon report will tell you. It says that climate change “has the potential to exacerbate many of the challenges we are dealing with today – from infectious disease to terrorism.”

Yes, if the planet gets too hot that might mean more terrorism. How? I have no idea. But if Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is so worried about climate change, then so should every other patriotic American, right?

Okay, let’s get serious. Certain American institutions should be above politics. That’s how things work in a democracy like ours. But on President Obama’s watch many of our institutions are not above politics; they’re waist deep into politics. And, sadly, that includes the United States military. More on this shortly. First, let’s see what other institutions of our government have been turned into political tools since Barack Obama became president.

Read more at Bernard Goldberg.com