From The Bear’s Corner: What a day yesterday was

We went from Attorney General Eric Holder being held in “Contempt of Congress” to Obama exerting “Executive Privilege” to withhold some 10,000 emails regarding “Fast and Furious” gun running from Congress.

If you thought the USS Obama had a bad week last week, their taking on water in a ship that is about to sink, it was nothing to compare to what happened yesterday.

As you will see from the expert opinions in the following articles, the President CAN NOT claim “Executive Privilege” unless he is directly involved in the chain of emails that Congress is seeking. So by his actions, it suggest direct involvement “Fast and Furious” gun running.

And for those of you naive enough to think Obama did this to protect his good friend Eric “the Red” Holder, think again. There is nothing and I mean nothing that is not expendable to Obama in his quest to transform the USA into his Marxist’s dream and that includes trashing the Country’s economy and the welfare of 300 million American People.

I think what is going on here is the greatest game of “chicken” ever played to see who will blink first. Eric Holder will soon find out what the underside of the bus looks like and the tradeoff will be his resignation with immunity from prosecution for protecting BHO.

Obama can’t let this fester for very long because it smells like a big time cover-up by the White House and as they say… “it not the initial crime that gets you in trouble, it’s the cover-up that sinks the ship.”

Extra: Fast and Furious, the Video

Quote of the Day 06/21/12

“If Americans wish to preserve a country they will recognize, then the first step is to recognize the enemy. Public education is the enemy. The entertainment industry is the enemy. The corporate culture is the enemy. The advertising industry is the enemy. And most of the politicians in both parties are the enemy. An enemy is defined as anybody, or any organization, which is attacking the traditional beliefs of Americans.”- Charley Reese Columnist

Executive Privilege and how the House should move forward legally By Mark Levin

As the Supreme Court recognized in US v. Nixon, the Executive Branch has a legitimate interest in confidentiality of communications among high officials so that the President can have the benefit of candid advice. However, as President Washington himself recognized, that privilege does not protect the President or his underlings from embarrassment or public exposure for questionable actions.

As the Supreme Court has also recognized repeatedly, the Congress, in the exercise of its constitutional powers, has the essential power to investigate the actions of the Executive Branch.

In this case, the exercise of Executive Privilege seems, in its timing and over-inclusiveness, to be nothing less than a political delaying tactic to prevent exposure of wrongdoing and incompetence that resulted in the murder of a American law enforcement agent and injury and death of many others. Further, a wholesale claim of privilege is facially improper: the President should be held to the standard that anyone claiming privilege is held to: identify each document in a log so that privilege can be disputed. (U.S. v. Nixon, 1974)

Because among the categories of documents sought are all those relating to the recantation by Holder of testimony before Congress, the demand goes to the core of the Congressional power under Article I. In this respect, this is not a general or oversight inquiry but a determination of why the Attorney General of the United States testified falsely before Congress about his own knowledge of a federal program. Presumptively, none of this category of documents is protected by Executive Privilege for wrongdoing per se is not protected by the privilege.

The right way to proceed is to hold Holder in contempt by resolution of the House and seek authorization from the House for the Committee, by its Chairman, to proceed by civil action to compel production of the documents. (Holder will not enforce a holding of contempt against himself — and by the way, he should have authorized, say, the assistant attorney general for legal counsel, to handle the contempt matter once the House voted as at that point he is representing his own interests and not those of the nation generally). Chairman Issa should file suit in federal court in DC and seek expedited action. There is no need for Senate action. The use of this procedure has been acknowledged by the Congressional Research Service in a 2007 study. Further, a privilege log should be sought by Issa and ordered produced immediately by the court, in camera inspection done promptly by the judge, and a final order entered compelling production of all documents for which no legitimate reason justifies Executive Privilege.

Yes, some documents may be covered by EP, but the blanket attachment of that label flouts the law and the Constitution, and harms the legitimate assertion of EP by Presidents of either party in the future. The Constitution is far too important to be subject to the caprice of this President and an AG who, on its face, wants to be free from scrutiny about why he testified falsely before a Committee of Congress.

Executive Privilege is a very important implied executive power, used in various forms since the presidency of George Washington. Therefore, it’s misuse and abuse, to cover-up wrongdoing, conceal embarrassing information, or advance a political agenda, diminishes the ability of future presidents to assert it legitimately.

Source: Mark Levin on Facebook

FLASHBACK 2007: Obama Attacked Trying “To Hide Behind Executive Privilege”

Obama’s Executive Privilege Has The Stench Of Cover-Up

Scandal: The president illegally asserts executive privilege to protect an attorney general who’s either a clueless political hack, malevolent or both, withholding answers of who is responsible for a Border Patrol agent’s death.

President Obama’s contempt for the rule of law hit a new low when, on the eve of a vote to hold Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt of Congress, he granted his AG’s 11th-hour request to hide sought-after documents on Operation Fast and Furious under the cover of executive privilege.

“I write now to inform you that the president has asserted executive privilege over the relevant post-Feb. 4, 2011, documents,” Deputy Attorney General James Cole says in a letter that GOP Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa received just before Wednesday’s hearing and vote, a letter that apparently was not mentioned in a last-minute meeting between Issa and Holder Tuesday night.

Or maybe it wasn’t the 11th hour at all, but just a long-planned final gambit in the cover-up of who made the decisions in a federally sponsored effort to provide Mexican drug cartels with sophisticated American firearms and who is ultimately responsible for the murder of Border Patrol agent Brian Terry with these weapons?

As Fox News anchor Brit Hume recently noted, speaking of Fast and Furious on the web-exclusive “Panel Plus” segment of “Fox News Sunday,” “The stench of cover-up on this gun-running operation is very strong indeed.”

Executive privilege, as Issa noted in his opening remarks, can only be asserted when it involves direct presidential decision-making and communications. It cannot be invoked, legally, to prevent others in the chain of command from explaining their actions or responding to requests for information on their decisions in which the president is not involved.

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