Foreign Policy: Chaos in Egypt

The foreign policies ramifications of what happens in Egypt are huge and should not be dismissed lightly. My first instincts reminded of one the biggest political blunders in the foreign policy arena when Jimmy Carter helped topple the pro-American Shah of Iran and see what that got us. There are stories out there that implicates the Obama White House has a hand in this revolution and yes that is what it is a revollution.

Muhammad Hosni Sayyid Mubarak is no saint but he was bought and paid for ally of the United States. Since he came to power three decades ago Uncle Sam has given Egypt an average of $2 billion dollars a year in foreign aid.

If the Muslim Brotherhood assumes power you will have regime similar to Iran and the ‘Brotherhood’ has direct links to Al Qaeda. Egypt is the largest Arab country in the Middle East and it controls the Suez Canal and can you imagine what the ramifications would be to world trade if the canal falls into the wrong hands.

I don’t think anyone knows, including the White House, what the ultimate resolution will be but given Obama dismal record in the foreign policy arena, to me it doesn’t look good and for Israel it spells disaster.

Here is a compilation of opinions in the following articles:

Timothy P. Carney – Entangling alliances: Is this Egypt revolution a good thing for America?

From all I read and hear, the Hosni Mubarak regime in Egypt is pretty oppressive, and the intense protests these days are a reaction to this oppression. All else being equal, this is a good thing. But foreign policy is messy, and there are always complicating factors. I’m a foreign policy novice, but it seems a real uprising in Egypt could leave the U.S. worse off.

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Neil Hrab – In Egypt, US must avoid wishful thinking

Because the anti-regime demonstrations are being organized with up-to-date technology, there’s a presumption among many observers that the protestors must also be committed to a progressive, democratic, liberal vision for Egypt – and that they therefore deserve US support.
(After all, opportunistic thugs, religious fanatics and authoritarians could never use tools like Twitter or Facebook to seize to power – could they?)

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Bruce McQuain – Where is Egypt headed?

That is the most pressing question of the moment, because as the protests build and show no signs of lessening, it is becoming clearer that its present course is about to be forever altered. What will the new Egypt look like?

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Kathryn Ciano – Egypt is a freedom fight

Addressing a torn Egypt, contested-president Mubarak just told Al Jazeera: “I will always be on the side of the poor.” As private jets flee a burning Cairo, it seems that all but the poor have done whatever they can to leave. Which recalls one banal truth to politics: It doesn’t matter if promises are empty if a politician’s promises are all the voters feel they have.

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Related

Obama Doctrine is Failing in the Middle East

The Middle East was meant to be the crowning achievement of the Obama Doctrine. Once in the White House, President Obama focused laser-like on a “charm offensive” with Iran. When voices rose against the regime in Tehran in the wake of a disputed national election, Obama offered virtually no support for the cries for freedom. Nevertheless, the “playing nice initiative” with Tehran fell flat. Today, the regime is more aggressive than ever—backing a terrorist take-over of the government in Lebanon, snubbing Western nuclear negotiators, and promoting an Islamist agenda across the region.

The other prong of the president’s outreach offensive was to throw all his energies into the peace negotiations between Palestine and Israel. Obama’s initiative, however, lacked new and constructive ideas. He has been equivocal in his support for Israel. The White House has failed to press for a hard line against Hamas, an avowed terrorist organization. The results here were all too predictable as well. The president has nothing to show for two years of inept effort.

Read more from Heritage.org, Foundry blog

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